Zoohackathon 2020 is a global competition run by the U.S. Department of State that harnesses the power of technological innovation and the raising of public awareness to combat wildlife trafficking. It brings together coders, university students, wildlife conservation experts, zoos, and other academic and nongovernmental organizations to develop wire-frame/demo technology solution ideas over 2.5 days.  We aim to turn these solution ideas into real-world technologies that can help combat wildlife trafficking into the future.  In prior years, this competition was held in-person, but as COVID-19 has made that infeasible for 2020, we have developed the Virtual Global Zoohackathon 2020. 

Zoohackathon 2020 will divide the world into five regional, or single nation, virtual hackathons, all of which will take place the weekend of November 5-7 (and staggered across different time zones).  These events focus on regional wildlife trafficking challenges -- including prevalent zoonotic disease vectors in each region -- and feature locally focused problem statements, prerecorded and live video presentations, fun and educational moments, partners and mentors, judging, and prizes.

Over 2.5 days, thousands of participants develop creative and innovative ideas for software solutions for real wildlife conservation problems through the Virtual Global Zoohackathon.  The top three winning teams from each regional, or single-nation, hackathon will virtually pitch their solution ideas to a panel of global judges during the Final Global Presentation Day.  This Presentation Day takes place the weekend after the regional hackathons conclude and the judges will announce the 2020 global winner.

Why is this important?

The U.S. Department of State plays an important role in the fight against wildlife trafficking by strengthening global enforcement, reducing demand for illegal wildlife products, and expanding international commitments.  Zoohackathon supports these efforts by engaging new audiences to develop new tech solutions to combat wildlife trafficking and building cross-sector partnerships across governments, the private sector, and intergovernmental stakeholders.

 

Hackathon Sponsors

Prizes

$15,000 in prizes

1st

1st Place - EGP15,000 Coding Classes
2nd Place - EGP10,000 Coding Classes
3rd Place - EGP5,000 Coding Classes

2nd

1st Place - EGP15,000 Coding Classes
2nd Place - EGP10,000 Coding Classes
3rd Place - EGP5,000 Coding Classes

3rd

1st Place - EGP15,000 Coding Classes
2nd Place - EGP10,000 Coding Classes
3rd Place - EGP5,000 Coding Classes

Devpost Achievements

Submitting to this hackathon could earn you:

Eligibility

Statement of Eligibility, License, and Release: Zoohackathon 2020

  • Must be at least 18 years old;
  • Cannot be personally employed by or have any immediate family employed by, serve as contractors for, or be interns, directors, or officers of the U.S. Government, the U.S. Department of State, or its Organizing Partner(s) (collectively, “Sponsors”) of Zoohackathon 2020 in any way, shape, or form.
  • Meet any and all other conditions of eligibility set forth in the Zoohackathon 2020 Official Terms and Rules (the “Rules”).

 

Requirements

Each team must submit one final presentation by 12pm (NOON) on November 7 at zoohackathon-2020.devpost.com in order to qualify for judging. The format of the submission is at the team's discretion, but must emphasize the following: 1) rational for choosing the problem statement; 2) approach to addressing the problem statement; 3) choice of code, tech, etc.; and 4) how the demo tech/code/wireframe developed by the team successfully addresses the problem outlined in their chosen problem statement. Presentations will also need to be presented to the judging panel per the attached Rules and Guidelines. 

Judges

Mohamed Fouad
Africa and Arab Collegiate Programming Championship

Kevin Krapf

Kevin Krapf
U.S. Embassy in Cairo

Rehab Abdelhamid

Rehab Abdelhamid
US Embassy in Cairo

Adel Samir
Africa and Arab Collegiate Programming Championship

Osama Hesham
Africa and Arab Collegiate Programming Championship

Mohamed Raouf
Nature Conservation Egypt/NCE

Hana ElSafoury
Nature Conservation Egypt/NCE

Khaled El Noby
Nature Conservation Egypt/NCE

Ehab Eid

Ehab Eid
Independent Consultant, IUCN SSC Steering Committee, SSC Vice Chair of West Asia

Hany El Shaer

Hany El Shaer
Regional Director, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Regional, Office for West Asia (ROWA)

Chuck Fee

Chuck Fee
U.S. Embassy in Cairo

Larissa Mihalisko

Larissa Mihalisko
US Embassy in Cairo

Marcus Barnes

Marcus Barnes
US Embassy in Cairo

Mahmoud Khaled

Mahmoud Khaled
Africa and Arab Collegiate Programming Championship

Omar Khaled

Omar Khaled
Africa and Arab Collegiate Programming Championship

Karim Tarek
Africa and Arab Collegiate Programming Championship

Mike Macleod

Mike Macleod

Judging Criteria

  • Quality of Idea/Innovation
    The degree to which the solution makes use of an innovative or creative approach to address an area of wildlife trafficking that has not been sufficiently addressed by existing technology.
  • Impact
    The degree to which this solution addresses a relevant problem for combating wildlife trafficking, has a predictably sustainable lifecycle, can easily be implemented and scaled, and contains a robust means for measuring or estimated results.
  • Interface
    The degree to which this solution is both intuitive and visually appealing for the user, and provides sufficient guidance for user interactions.

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